Friday, September 19, 2014
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From Marx to Lenin to Gramsci to Marcuse ... the subversion of academia is complete: Cultural relativism is taught (an old story), and promiscuity is not just non-judgmentally tolerated (as per cultural relativism), it is now actively  encouraged by the Yale Dean's Office. And do, the dean says, tell us all about it.

From the Yale Daily News (via Michael Rubin at The Corner):

The Yale Dean's Office's is planning a web venture: hosting student essays "by current undergraduates, allowing them to reflect anonymously on their sexual experiences at Yale and their impressions of the sexual culture here."

It goes one from here. And don't miss the comments.

New motto suggestion from what you might almost call an Old Blue:

Lux and Voyeurism.

 

 

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Chalk one up for their side. Again.

From the AP: "Danish daily issues apology over prophet drawing"

That would be this, in case you didn't know:



A Danish newspaper on Friday apologized for offending Muslims by reprinting a cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad with a bomb-shaped turban, rekindling heated debate about the limits of freedom of speech.

Danish daily Politiken said its apology was part of a settlement with a Saudi lawyer representing eight Muslim groups in the Middle East and Australia.

The Breitbart story...

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Sheriff Joe Arapaio is for Hayworth; Sarah Palin is for McCain. Why? Answer below

What drew me to the Arizona GOP Senate primary story, the subject of this week's column (below and here), was not just the face-off between liberal John McCain and conservative J.D. Hayworth. It was also the weird warning bells that went off with some big-name conservatives, particularly conservative poster-girl Sarah Palin, endorsing John McCain. Not only is the philosophical breach seemingly unpassable, it's hard to forget what a rat he was to her as both he and his staff savaged her in the wake of the prez campaign. 

Meanwhile, Romney, Dick Armey, Fred Thompson and Sen. Kyl, I believe, have linked arms with McCain as well.

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I almost forgot what it felt like to experience McCain Derangement Syndrome. Then I saw this web ad attack on McCain's Senate primary challenger J.D. Hayworth (who only shows common sense and a modicum of grit in pointing out that "questions will remain" until Obama releases his birth certificate paperwork). Then I wrote this week's (upcoming) column. Then I felt better.

 



I'm driving along, I turn on the radio , a gravelly voice with an unplaceable Northeastern accent comes on ...

"...and during that period with Nazism and fascism growing -- a real danger to the United States and Democratic countries all over the world -- there were people in this Congress, in the British parliament saying, 'don't worry! Hitler is not real! It'll disappear! We don't have to be prepared to take it on....'" My gosh, who is that talking so forthrightly about the failure of the West to face up to the existential threat of Islam -- on AM drive-time radio?

Darn that dream. The speaker was Bernie Sanders, Vermont's "independent" senator, and he was talking not about Islamic apologists who deny the perils of Islamization and the spread of liberty-strangling sharia (Islamic law), but about those of us who have by now figured out that global warming -- sorry, climate-change -- is a lot of bunk based on a noxious brew of cooked scientific data and warmed-over Karl Marx.

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Two pieces by esteemed contributors to this blog have come out elsewhere this week, both on topics largely ignored by the media, the punditry and the military and civilian leadership, and both on topics related to the appalling failures of the same to ensure that the nation's military forces receive justice and a fair shake as they struggle with hostiles abroad and a hostile miiltary justice system at home.

"John Murtha Forgot Semper Fi" by Tom Stone appears here in the Washington Examiner.

"Imprisoned for Saving American Lives" by John L. Work appears here at Frontpagemag.com.

Must reads.

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Astonishing how quietly retired General and former Secretary of State Alexander Haig passed away this past weekend, slipping the mortal coil practically incognito -- at least for a significant historical figure whose decades of service to this nation spanned war and tumultous peace.

Sure, there were front-page obituaries in the big papers, and yes, they all pounced one more time on his post Reagan-assassination-attempt "I'm in charge" routine -- a bogus splice of life, the way the media played it, that always cut the part where he said he would of course be informing the vice president if anything came up while he was in transit back to Washington ....

Tom DeFrank discusses Haig's key contributions in the darkest days of Watergate here.

Arnaud de Brochgrave recounts Haig's impressive military career (and strange-sounding later-life devotion to communist China) here.

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Here is the fourth part of "Flirting with Afghanistan," text, photos and captions by Paul Avallone. (See here for Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3.) In this final installment, Avallone examines the exploitation, segregation and enslavement of girls and women in Afghan Islamic society -- a society the US-led coalition is prepared to die for, defend and perpetuate.



Stare into this girl's eyes, stare long, and she'll capture you, and you won't be able to look away. Then realize that I took this photograph in early 2003, when I and my Special Forces team mates played in our "Chocolate Alley" Jalalabad neighborhood of our safehouse base with the scores and scores of kids who trusted us and were unafraid of us, confident of our intent for good rather than bad, to the point that even the girls were photographical. Look again at this girl, then realize that, seven years later, she has been long married as well as long under a burqa. Under a burqa. Not just the pure beauty, but--look at her--whatever is going on in that mind.

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The Dutch government has fallen for the fifth time since 2002.

”This is a beautiful day,” Mr Wilders said. ”The worst cabinet in Dutch history no longer exists and people can let their voices be heard by voting in a few months’ time.”

 

 



Our leaders, military and civilian, all wanted to ignore the June 2009  jihad attack on Pvt. William Long outside an Army Navy recruiting center in Little Rock.

They still do.

Watch this video interview with Pvt. Long's father Daris Long and see if you can, too.

This week's column:

Remember last June when President Obama traveled to Saudi Arabia because, as he put it, "It was very important to come to the place where Islam began and seek his majesty's counsel"?

I argued at the time, gagging, that rather than visiting "the place where Islam began," the president of the United States should have gone to the place where Islam had just ended the life of a U.S. soldier. I refer to the U.S. Army-Navy recruiting center in Little Rock, Ark., where on June 1, Muslim convert...

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Left to right: Capt Roger Hill, Officer in Charge of the Honor Guard at Ronald Reagan's funeral, and in Afghanistan.

Remember Capt. Roger Hill? Almost exactly one year ago to the day, I wrote:

After four years at West Point, nine years of honorable service, including two wars (Iraq and Afghanistan) and a Bronze Star for valor, Captain Roger Hill now faces a "less than honorable discharge" in a massive miscarriage of military "justice."

The story?

As three retired senior officers--Army Col. Andy O'Meara, Air Force Lt. Gen. Thomas McInerny and Army Maj. Gen. Paul Vallely--explained his case in an op-ed posted at the time, Capt. Hill was commanding a lonely outpost in 2008 in Wardak Province, Afghanistan, "an area the size of Connecticut with many Taliban lurking amid...

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Photo: A U.S. soldier returns fire as others run for cover during a firefight with insurgents in the Badula Qulp area, West of Lashkar Gah in Helmand province, southern Afghanistan, on Sunday, Feb. 14, 2010. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito)

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At the end of an AP "analysis" today by Anne Gearan and Anne Flagerty comes this comment from C. Christine Fair in response to happy talk from national security advisor James Jones about how Marjah "will demonstrate, I think successfully, that the new elements of the strategy will work." Jones, the AP writers note, "listed economic reform and good local governance in the same breath with the security bought with military might."

"That's where I get really skeptical," said Georgetown University professor C. Christine Fair, a former U.N. official in Afghanistan.

"I don't know where they found 2,000 Afghan police [mentioned earlier in the...

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Oh, to see former US Rep. J.D. Hayworth (GOP) trounce current Sen. John McCain ("Maverick") in Arizona's Republican Senate primary on August 24. Hayworth announced his candidacy this week.

McCain is everything wrong with the Republican Party, and despite the deep despair the Obama administration inspires, I still think (I think) a McCain presidency would have been somehow worse in the long run (if there is a long run ...).

A McCain administration would have been merely lousy. But it would have left the republic adrift in some similar and significant ways -- the disastrously prosecuted war, the drumbeat for illegal alien amnesty (one of Hayworth's major claims to fame is his staunch determination...

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I don't know why the British newspapers seem to offer better war  coverage, but they often do. Here, vivid and extremely disturbing reporting (compare to Wall Street Journal here) from Ben Anderson of the Times of London on what our ROE-handcuffed troops are going through to take that prize package Marjah (above).

We clung to the steep sides of the canal trying to find some safe ground halfway up the bank. A rocketpropelled grenade came in just over our heads and exploded against the wall behind us. The Marines either side of me were hit with shrapnel. One, Doc Morrison, took a chunk of metal in his leg that severed an artery. The helicopter called to evacuate him came under machinegun and rocket fire.

Captain...

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Radio News Netherland reports:

A conference centre in The Hague has cancelled the launch of a book criticising Islam. The book launch was scheduled for Thursday at The World Forum, but was cancelled because the director of the venue does not believe he can guarantee the safety of his guests.

The book in question is Islamofobie? (Islamophobia?), written by Islam critic and PVV supporter Frans Groenendijk. The PVV, or Freedom Party is an anti-Islamic opposition party led by Geert Wilders.

Must be Geert's fault somehow.



Photo: Afghanistan Marine BG Lawrence "Eat Lots of Goat" Nicholson

The Battle of Marjah continues, only it's not a "battle" as understood in the traditional sense of the word. Marjah is a deadly foray into "armed social work" for US troops who probably thought they had signed up to fight for their country.

Wrong country.

“What are we here for?” Brig. Gen. Larry Nicholson, the top Marine commander in Afghanistan, would shout to his troops.

“The people!” was the troops’ refrain.

And yes, that would be "the people" of Afghanistan.

More from the AP:

MARJAH, Afghanistan — Some American and Afghan troops say they’re fighting the latest offensive...

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Here is the third installment of "Flirting with Afghanistan," text, photos and captions by Paul Avallone. Catch up on Part 1 here and Part 2 here.

 

GIs inspect a school, built the previous year through US aid and contracts, and subsequently destroyed by the Taliban. 2008.



A villager says his piece in a meeting with American soldiers. 2008.



"Afghan TV":...

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Via ISAF: Valentine's Day at the Battle of Marjah.

The news from Marjah is increasingly surreal as "counterinsurgency" theory goes into battle -- "counterinsurgency" being a fancy word for hearts-and-minds nation-building.

Example: A rocket hits the wrong compound, killing 10 "civilians." Since COIN means always having to say you're sorry, the commanding general not only "apologizes" in the middle of the battle, he suspends the further use of the rocket in the middle of the battle. This is in line with the guiding fantasy of COIN warfare -- that it is possible to "win" the confidence, trust, "hearts and minds," whatever of the "people," as though war were a popularity contest, and after eight-plus-years the Muslims of Afghanistan still can't make up their...

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LTC Allen West (ret.) is a man who isn't afraid of enemy fire or speaking the truth, and voters in Florida's District 22, from Jupiter to Ft. Lauderdale, are lucky pups to be able to vote him into Congress this November. When they do -- and they better not blow it -- the rest of the United States will finally have his leadership where we need it ... in Washington, DC.

Via Andrew Bostom.

 



Asia Times map via Long War Journal report on post-Keating Taliban rule in Kamdesh.

This week's column is about an age-old story, how Big Fish sacrifice small fry to stay Big Fish. The story the column was triggered by came out last Friday, when the Washington Post reported on military investigations into battles at Wanat, Ganjgal and Kamdesh, all in Afghanistan.

The U.S. military has reprimanded an unusually large number of commanders for battlefield failures in Afghanistan in recent weeks, reflecting a new push by the top brass to hold commanders responsible for major incidents in which troops are killed or wounded, said senior military officials.     

Fyi, "top brass" = Big Fish in this story.

Having covered -- no, railed about -- the rules of engagement inflicted on commanders by top brass in thrall to the PC doctrine of "counterinsurgency"...

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Touching down at COP Keating, March 2009

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The battle of Kamdesh on October 3, 2009 is the focus of this week's upcoming column -- specifically, the Pentagon's reported decision to punish mid-level commanders for intelligence failures that preceded the brutal battle that left eight Americans dead. According to an investigation, commanders ignored local intelligence indicating that a large attack against COP Keating was likely andfailed to take appropriate defensive measures.

That may be. But why was a small US outpost in Kamdesh in the first place? And, if there, why was it based for three years in an indefensible position? The real blame for the battle of Kamdesh lies with the military brass behind this fatally pointless and needlessly dangerous mission. Before deciding whether you agree, watch the below video of the base and battle site, COP Keating, taken last summer by Britain's News 4 photographer Stuart Webb (via Burnpit,  which has more Keating video.)

...

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Just another day in Pakistan, where jihadi symps last week expressed their opinion of the US conviction of "Lady Al Qaeda," Aafia Siddiqui, who was found guilty in a Manhattan court of trying to kill US personnel in Afghanistan.

Now for something completely new and different:

Headline: "British parliamentarians for public inquiry into Dr. Aafia Siddiqui's conviction"

Lead: Describing the conviction of Pakistani neuroscientist Dr.Aafia Siddiqui as “miscarriage of justice”, British Parliamentarians have called for withdrawal of case against her and repatriation to Pakistan.

British parliamentarians?

Muslim members of British Parliament is more to the point. The story from the Associated Press of...

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Remember Omer Bajwa, Yale's "Muslim Victory" Chaplain?

The one who was reported to have told an Islamabad audience "Muslims will win the final victory in the West if they conform to their beliefs and disseminate the message of Islam with wisdom and politeness"?

The one who slandered Kurt Westergaard by publicly stating at Yale in front of the cartoonist that he, the Muslim Victory Chaplain, had read in the New York Times that Kurt's son had converted to Islam -- when there was no such story in the New York Times, while Kurt's son has not converted to Islam?

The one who, practicing taqiyya,...

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Protocol calls: Who in the EU gets to receive President Obowma?

While EU officials mud wrestle each other for the fun of receiving Obama and, more important, his bow in a US-EU summit to be, the words "Greek" and "economy" come together and threaten to pull the EU apart. Paul Belien explains in "The EU's Horrible Honeymoon" at the Brussels Journal:

Last week, Barack Obama snubbed the Europeans by refusing to attend next May’s European Union summit in Madrid. The Europeans are very upset. But that is not the worst of their problems, and neither is the looming bankruptcy of Greece. Analysts fear that Spain might sink the euro, the EU’s common currency, and with the euro also the dreams of greater political integration.

At this point Europe is not even halfway its 100-day political “honeymoon” since the Treaty of Lisbon, which transformed the EU into a state in...

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Ilmar Reepalu is the Mayor of Malmo, Sweden, but he could well serve as the Mouthpiece of Eurabia, having crystallized its essence in a recent interview about rocketing Antisemitism in his city. Malmo (pop. 250,000), a confortable train ride across the Oresund strait from Copenhagen, is Sweden's third-largest city, a Leftist-jihadist territory where like-minded Leftist "antifa" Swedes and Muslim immigrants, the 21st-century's alliance of Brown Shirts and Black Shirts, effectively arm "civilized" Socialist rule with the under-flowing threat and as-necessary implementation of violence.

You may recall the March 2009 Davis Cup match between Sweden and Israel that was played in Malmo sans spectators after the City Council voted five to four to hold the match in an empty stadium. As the Jerusalem Post noted...

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Here is Part 2 of "Flirting with Afghanistan," text, photos and captions by Paul Avallone.

(Part 1 is here.)



By 2008, the Taliban had finely honed their roadside bomb-making, -employing and -initiating skills to the point where, as here, a bomb totally demolished the uparmored humvee, immediately killing the four GIs and one Afghan interpreter. September 2008.





Oh, for a return to those halcyon days of the first couple of years of the war, when there was no thought at all about the possibility...

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Behold the smug mug of Willem Stegeman, who has made a Dutch state-subsidized film "spoofing" an assassination attempt on Geert Wilders.

"Spoofing."

Of course, the grotesquerie of Stegeman and his "spoof" are not the main story in a backward -- no, twisted -- report from Radio Netherlands Worldwide (RNW) that leads with the response ("furious") of Party for Freedom (PVV) members over "Radio FunX's" assassination-attempt entertainment. Almost as breath-taking is the nasty photo of Wilders with which RNW, supposedly a news organization, illustrates the story.

Currently embroiled in open-ended Kafka-esque legal jeopardy, Wilders has lived under permanent threat of death since that November day in 2004 when Theo van Gogh was assassinated...

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A couple of week's ago, I blogged about Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal's charm-blitz through NY, juxtaposing Fox News' Neil Cavuto's sweetheart interview with "the prince" and Charlie Rose's far more revealing conversation -- essentially, it's (everything's) all Israel's fault, and "my" 1.5 billion Muslims are all like the underpants' bomber's father.

I kept thinking about Alwaleed -- his stake in News Corp., his stakes in Georgetown and Harvard -- and realized that as a leading scion of the so-called House of Saud (q: how many countries are named for their rulers?), a totalitarian theocracy whose foundational documents...

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Behold (courtesy Tundra Tabloids) the very image of Dutch "justice." After today's "judicial" proceedings in Amsterdam, Holland itself is forever besmirched, its "judges" having made it clear that no semblance of fairness will enter into their proceeeding against Geert Wilders. As noted below, the "judges" slashed the roster of witnesses the Wilders defense team planned to call to the stand from eighteen to three.

John L. Work writes at Newsreal:

Even if you have never been involved in a criminal prosecution wherein your very freedom is at risk, I want you to now imagine that you and your attorney have prepared a defense that includes a list of witnesses that will provide a mountain of exculpatory evidence.  Then, imagine that the Court summarily and arbitrarily decides that it will not listen to nearly ninety percent of your case.

...

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Photoshopped image by Baron Bodissey

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This just in:

The second day of the Geert Wilders trial in Amsterdam ended after a short session in which the court ruled that it was competent to try the case (a real cliffhanger-not). The court-ruled "competent" court then pared down the list of 18 witnesses whom Wilders had wished to call in his defense to only three people: the Dutch Arabists Jansen and Admiraal, plus Syrian-born, all-American-heroine Wafa Sultan, author of the must-read A God Who Hates.

For extensive and unique translations of Dutch- (and other-) langauge coverage of this barely reported on but urgently significant court case, see Gates of Vienna. Geert Wilders has launched an English-language website to track trial events at Wilders on Trial.

If anyone is puzzled as to why there is so little MSM...

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There is something surreal about today's featured story, an Air Force Magazine rah-rah treatement of Gen. McChrystal's ball-and-chain rules of engagement and the crackpot-zen vogue for what is known as "counterinsurgency" warfare. It is called "Holding Fire Over Afghanistan" -- which already sounds like a spoof -- and it begins with a subhead:

"Airmen adapt to the McChrystal directive."

Now, before going any further, here is a link to the McChrystal directive, the portions of which that were released to the public. (I shudder to think what the unreleased portions say.) Every American should read it and, as blood pressure levels suggest, call his representatives in Washington...

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More evidence of massive "surge" backfire -- if, in fact, US strategic interests were the guiding concern. What was that rousing slogan: Making the world safe for sharia ... Iran ... AND China?

From the AP:

Iraq says China has agreed to write off 80 percent of its Saddam Hussein-era debt.

A statement posted on the Iraqi Finance Ministry Web site on Tuesday put Iraq's debt to China at $8.5 billion.

The statement says the promise followed a meeting between China's ambassador to Iraq and Iraq's Finance Minister Bayan Jabr.

Gee, do you think they talked about us?

It says the write-off "will enhance economic cooperation between the two friendly countries."

How friendly.

The deal could further push Chinese business...

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Someday, civilian and military leaders responsible for these rules of engagement, this policy of sacrificing American troops to make the barbarians of Afghanistan "like us" should come before at the very least a Congressional hearing, but at this point an out-for-blood people's tribunal seems more appropriate. What they are doing to our military, our treasury, our power and our prestige is an unconscionable national betrayal.

The following news story describes the toll these rules, this policy is taking on our bravest young men -- amoebas in a petri dish to the mad, see-no-Islam social engineers masquerading as American statesmen and generals.

From the Telegraph:

On a base near Marjah, a Taliban stronghold in Helmand...

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Princeton prof: "Reminds me a lot of Scalia in their approach to texts ..."

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Last time I mentioned the NYT's Andrea Elliott it was to call her on her lavish and pristine three-part whitewash of Brooklyn imam Reda Shata. Example:

Then there was the series' look at terrorism. "What I may see as terrorism, you may not see that way," Mr. Shata says. What does he mean by that? The reporter [Elliott] doesn't tell us. Hamas is a powerful symbol of resistance, he says; the assassinated Hamas founder Sheik Ahmed Yassin was the "martyred" "lion of Palestine," he sermonizes; and yet the imam says he condemns all violence. How does he square...

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As promised, the first installment of "Flirting with Afghanistan: Dispatches from the Frontline." Text, photographs and captions by Paul Avallone.

Written in 2008, this essay presents provocative and thoughtful analysis by someone with the dual credentials of having served in Afghanistan in US Special Forces and having later returned there as a journalist. And it includes some of the most evocative and raw writing on Afghan culture you will ever read on the war ....



A party thrown by a rural warlord for US Army Special Forces is missing only one thing, what anything outside the immediate family is always missing: females. In this completely dominate male culture, it is men with men only and always. Period. Nangarhar province, 2003.

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0 false 18 pt 18 pt 0 0 false false false /* Style...

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This is a picture of Prez Obama lobbing a grapefruit to the GOP to bat out of the park: namely, when in meeting with the GOP yesterday he derided conservative opposition to Obamacare (which proposes to nationalize one-sixth of the economy) and said: "You'd think this thing was some Bolshevik plot."

Um, yeah. "Bolshevik," "Marxist-Leninist," "Socialist," "Communist," "Progressive" -- take your pick.It's not a plot, of course, because it's in the open. Hiding in plain sight.

Imagine if the GOP had agreed with the president and embarked on a little history lesson to connect Obama with his ideological roots for the American people ...

But no.

Here's the relevant Obama  transcript from the White House.

...The component parts of...

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This is a "postcard" from Afghanistan created by ex-Green Beret, sometime- writer-journalist Paul Avallone. The dark humor of the captions is one way to defuse the nakedly discomforting essence of the bizarre and the malevolent on display in the photo he took -- a picture of people our troops have been ordered to bribe, placate, and, I'm afraid, serve, in a disastrous policy that amounts to submission. What else can we call a war policy that puts United States Marines in charge of mosque-building?



Shortly, I will begin posting Paul's equally evocative and vivid essay "Flirting with Afghanistan" in several installments, along with more of the photos he took while working as a journalist in Afghanistan after serving there earlier in the war.

...

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From the Times of India, January 29:

LONDON: A one-day international conference on Afghanistan on Thursday rejected India's argument that there were no degrees of Talibanism. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, hosting the conference with Afghan President Hamid Karzai and UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon, announced in his opening address the establishment of a $500 million 'trust fund' to buy "peace and integration" with warriors who are engaged in violence for economic rather than ideological reasons. A whopping $140 million has been pledged already for this year. During his pre-conference discussion with the British foreign secretary David Miliband,...

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Via IsraelInsider.com.

Fascinating clip (below) from KTLA-Los Angeles report Sam Rubin, who, in interviewing Mel Gibson in the run-up to his first movie in seven years, which  opens this weekend, asks him about the reception the actor might receive from audiences who remembered Gibson's anti-Semitic rant on being arrested for drunkenness in 2006.

Ugly response.



...

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This week's column presents an interview with Ayad Jamal Aldin, a Shiite cleric and member of Iraqi parliament, someone I first noticed in April 2003, before the new Iraqi constitution that enshrines sharia above all was even written. The occasion, in fact, was the first post-liberation meeting of Iraqis to discuss a new constitution. The column I wrote at the time begins like this: 

April 21, 2003:

After roughly 100 Iraqi exiles, sheiks and clerics gathered in a fortified and air-conditioned tent in Iraq this week to begin piecing together their country's future, U.S. Central Command headquarters released a 13-point summary of the meeting that included the outcome of the historic first vote in Saddam-free Iraq. The Iraqi proto-body voted to meet again in 10 days, and also voted on a string of high-minded resolutions.

Point one said "Iraq must be a democracy"; point three...

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Photo: Somali students (of Al-Shabbab?) at St Cloud State University in Minnesota protesting homemade anti-Mohammed cartoons found posted on several utility poles. (I'm not kidding.)

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There I was, innocently looking into whether CAIR-OK's outrage of Sen. Inhofe's common-sense statement -- "I believe in racial and ethnic profiling" when it comes to defending airplanes against jihadis with bombs in their underpants -- had come to anything when I found that CAIR-MN was where the action is, Or, rather, as Refugee Resettlement Watch has been chronicling, St. Cloud, MN is where the dhimmitude is.

From a CAIR-MN press release:

CAIR-MN Holds St. Cloud Town Hall on Anti-Muslim Hate

...

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There is a line between President Bush's final SOTU address in January 2008 and today's 70-nation summit in London on whether to buy off, I mean "reintegrate," the Taliban with $100 million per year for 15 years (anyway), if Hamid Karzai (above with Gordon Brown) has his way. A friend, writing in, dubs the proposal TARP -- Taliban Assistance Restitution Program.

In his culminatingly empty SOTU, Prez Bush said that "we are engaged in the defining ideological struggle of the 21st century" without ever defining the ideology of the struggle. Didn't even give a hint. So much for the War President, exiting the stage with a whisper. I wrote:

Such vagueness marked his seventh and final annual address as strangely vacuous. Writing at the Counterterrorism Blog, Andrew Cochran elaborated on this theme, contrasting...

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There was something surreal about last night's SOTU by the POTUS, with his long (long) remarks on struggle and strife centering on the economy and health care (!) as though he didn't, as C-in-C, also have the US military at war(s) doing some major struggling and striving of its own. One young vet's comment: If the president is so concerned about college funding and health care for all, he could suggest that students join the Reserves where they already receive "universal" college funding and health care ("or they could go on active duty....").

I zoned in and out, but talk of "finally" strengthening laws on "hate" crimes was offhand-chilling, as was the president's, I believe, unprecedented hectoring of the Supreme Court as it sat before him over its recent decision to loosen restrictions on spending by corporations and unions on political advertising -- a victory for free speech.

...

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Photos: Bombs bursting in Baghdad and Kabul (or vice versa). Surge on.

This week, the bombs are exploding in US-liberated Baghdad. Earlier this month, they were exploding in US-liberated Kabul.

What's it all about? A January 19 feature story by a reporter-in-Wonderland from the Guardian (via RealClearWorld) sheds a surprising amount of ligh:

From "Afghanistan's Holy Violence":

Afghanistan is a curious place. Those who kill are called martyrs. Those who they kill are also called martyrs and the violence is apparently done for the sake of God.

"God is everywhere in Kabul," said a friend who recently returned to the city. "It's like a dictatorship. There is no escaping God here."...

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Today, I am posting an extraordinary letter from a soldier currently stationed in Iraq, a sometime penpal of mine to whom I sent my three-part series on the aftermath of the surge to elicit his opinion. Knowing how thoughtful he is, I expected a substantive response. Given his time constraints alone, I did not expect an essay of this scope and I decided, with his permission, to present it here. It is unlike any commentary I have read from Iraq; it is both coolly reasoned and deeply passionate, and certain to challenge and disturb readers across the political spectrum: PC-believing liberals, Iraq-as-success-believing conservatives, Islam-as-a-religion-of-peaceniks of both Left and Right.

So be it.

...

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Since when does a vice president apologize for the US justice system on foreign soil -- particularly on foreign soil where minority rights and the rule of law are regularly trampled and American interests are  not backed up?

More American bowing and scraping to the umma, as reported on by Reuters:

The [US] government will appeal a court decision to dismiss charges...

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I still can't bring myself to concentrate on this inanity of a piece (referenced here) but while considering whether to write to the NYT reporter who casually repeated an absurdly cracked slander of me as a "fascist" without calling me for comment, I came across this paragraph again: Regardless of whether Johnson’s view of Vlaams Belang is correct, it is notable that the party is defined for him entirely by the trail it has left on the Internet. This isn’t necessarily unfair — a speech, say, given by Dewinter isn’t any more or less valuable as evidence of his political positions depending on whether you read it (or watch it) on a screen or listen to it in a crowd — but it does have a certain flattening effect in terms of time: that hypothetical speech exists on the...

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A slow snooze day at the New York Times, which recently featured a piece I can hardly wake myself up to mention except that it casually defames -- as only the uninformed can casually defame -- one of the true heroes of our times, Filip Dewinter (above) of the Vlaams Belang party in Belgium.

As many readers know, I have written extensively about Filip and his party's  courageous political battle to halt and reverse the Islamization of Belgium since I first met him almost exactly three years ago.

Did I say courageous? Here's a look at what it takes to make the case against Islamization in Europe today.



Here is Filip Dewinter (with megaphone) in October 2008, after having been attacked as he arrived to participate in a debate at the University of Ghent....

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Stars and Stripes photo: Pvt. Abdulaziz Alqahtani, who serves with the special security force from Bahrain, is among 125 troops from the Muslim nation deployed to Helmand province, Afghanistan.

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Take your eyes away for a few days and look what happens:

From the AP:

KABUL — NATO forces in Afghanistan are preparing to limit night raids on private homes, even if it means losing some tactical advantage, to curb rising public anger....

Nighttime raids on private homes have emerged as the Afghans’ No. 1 complaint after Gen. Stanley McChrystal limited the use of airstrikes and other weaponry last year.

What will be next?

The U.S. and allied nations have made protecting the population a priority over the use of massive firepower as they seek to undermine support for the Taliban.

Only don't protect them at night.

“It addresses the issue that’s probably the most socially irritating thing that we do — and that is entering people’s homes at night,” Smith said Wednesday at his office in Kabul. He would not elaborate pending a formal announcement.

...

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