Wednesday, October 01, 2014
   

 

American Betrayal

NOW AVAILABLE IN PAPERBACK!

"This explosive book is a long-needed answer to court histories that continue to obscure key facts about our backstage war with Moscow. Must-reading for serious students of security issues and Cold War deceptions, both foreign and domestic."

-- M. Stanton Evans, author of Stalin's Secret Agents and Blacklisted by History: The Untold Story of Senator Joe McCarthy and His Fight Against America's Enemies

"[West] only claims `to connect the dots,' which is a very modest description of the huge and brilliant work she has obviously done. ... It is not simply a good book about history. It is one of those books which makes history."

-- Vladimir Bukovsky, author of To Build a Castle and co-founder of the Soviet dissident movement, and Pavel Stroilov, author of Behind the Desert Storm.

"Every once in a while, something happens that turns a whole structure of preconceived ideas upside down, shattering tales and narratives long taken for granted, destroying prejudice, clearing space for new understanding to grow. Diana West's latest book, American Betrayal, is such an event."
 
-- Henrik Raeder Clausen, Europe News

"No book has ever frightened me as much as American Betrayal. ... It all adds up to a story so disturbing that it has changed my attitude to almost everything I think about how the world actually is."

-- Steven Kates, Quadrant

Her task is ambitious; her sweep of crucial but too-little-known facts of history is impressive; and her arguments are eloquent and witty. ... American Betrayal is one of those books that will change the way many of us see the world.

-- Susan Freis Falknor, Blue Ridge Forum

“What Diana West has done is to dynamite her way through several miles of bedrock. On the other side of the tunnel there is a vista of a new past. Of course folks are baffled. Few people have the capacity to take this in. Her book is among the most well documented I have ever read. It is written in an unusual style viewed from the perspective of the historian—but it probably couldn’t have been done any other way.”

-- Lars Hedegaard, historian, editor, Dispatch International

"Diana West's new book rewrites WWII and Cold War history not by disclosing secrets, but by illuminating facts that have been hidden in plain sight for decades. Furthermore, she integrates intelligence and political history in ways never done before."

-- Jeffrey Norwitz, former professor of counterterrorism, Naval War College

Diana West’s American Betrayal — a remarkable, novel-like work of sorely needed historical re-analysis — is punctuated by the Cassandra-like quality of “multi-temporal” awareness. ... But West, although passionate and direct, is able to convey her profoundly disturbing, multi-temporal narrative with cool brilliance, conjoining meticulous research, innovative assessment, evocative prose, and wit.

-- Andrew G. Bostom, PJ Media

Do not be dissuaded by the controversy that has erupted around this book which, if you insist on complete accuracy, would be characterized as a disinformation campaign.

-- Jed Babbin, The American Spectator

The most important anti-Communist book of our time.

-- J.R. Nyquist, contributor, And Reality Be Damned ... What Media Didn't Tell You about the End of the Cold War and the Fall of Communism in Europe

The polemics against your Betrayal have a familiar smell: The masters of the guild get angry when someone less worthy than they are ventures into the orchard in which only they are privileged to harvest. The harvest the outsider brought in, they ritually burn.

-- Hans Jansen, former professor of Islamic Thought, University of Utrecht 

West's lesson to Americans: Reality can't be redacted, buried, fabrictaed, falsified, or omitted. Her book is eloquent proof of it.

-- Edward Cline, Family Security Matters

In American Betrayal, Ms. West's well-established reputation for lacking "sacred cows" remains intact. The resulting beneficiaries are the readers, especially those who can deal with the truth.

-- Wes Vernon, Renew America

After reading American Betrayal and much of the vituperation generated by neconservative "consensus" historians, I conclude that we cannot ignore what West has demonstrated through evidence and cogent argument.

-- John Dale Dunn, M.D., J.D., Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons

Enlightening. I give American Betrayal five stars only because it is not possible to give it six.

-- John Dietrich, formerly of the Defense Intelligence Agency and author of The Morgenthau Plan: Soviet Influence on American Postwar Policy.

If you're looking for something to read, this is the most dazzling, mind-warping book I have read in a long time. It has been criticized by the folks at Front Page, but they don't quite get what Ms. West has set out to do and accomplished. I have a whole library of books on communism, but -- "Witness" excepted -- this may be the best.

-- Jack Cashill, author of Deconstructing Obama: The Lives, Loves and Letters of America's First Postmodern President and First Strike: TWA Flight 800 and the Attack on America

American Betrayal is a monumental achievement. Brilliant and important.

-- Monica Crowley, Fox News analyst, radio host and author of What the Bleep Just Happened: The Happy Warriors Guide to the Great American Comeback

"If you haven't read Diana West's "American Betrayal" yet, you're missing out on a terrific, real-life thriller."

-- Brad Thor, author of the New York Times bestsellers Hidden Order, Black List and The Last Patriot.


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Blog
Feb 16

Written by: Diana West
Saturday, February 16, 2013 8:20 AM 

Minibar's "dragon's breath" course is a curried popcon ball dunked in liquid nitrogen.

Did the president eat it in one bite, as staff suggests, so vapor would stream from his nose?

---

In case anyone is wondering what the Obamas' Valentine's Day dinner out at Minibar was like, here is a recent Barron's review of dinner for two, which came to $958.

From Barron's Penta Daily: Insights and advice for families with assets of $5 million or more [no wonder I never read it before]:

"A Bargain Dinner at $500 a Head"

At 6 p.m. on a rainy night this week, my guest and I sat down at the counter of Washington D.C.’s Minibar. Only six privileged guests at a time dine here on a 26-course meal handcrafted by Chef Jose Andres and his young staff.

One of the most acclaimed restaurants in the country, there is no shingle announcing Minibar on the corner of E and 9th streets, just an anonymous frosted-glass door of the type I’ve previously seen at private banks on the Bahnhofstrasse in Zurich. But behind the door stands a hostess with iPad. She took us from the white foyer to an adjacent waiting room, where more smart-looking staff brought us a cocktail, hot towel, and a wooden box filled with seaweed-dusted rice crackers.

We privileged six were ushered behind a diaphanous curtain, to the island counter where two dozen staff members stood waiting to serve us. The minimalist white-walls and chairs, coupled with banks of steel cooking ranges, created an aesthetic I would describe as 1960s Courreges-meets-Japanese-sushi-bar.

I was, quite frankly, unprepared for what followed. A dozen talented chefs ranging in age from 21 to 34, performed for us a culinary ballet, starting with a frozen cocktail made with St. Germain, a liqueur of distilled Alpine elderflower, and served in the form of a snowball. A wine-red pillow the size of a postage stamp was decorated with a dainty white flower; it was filled with peanut butter and jelly.

A pink piggy made of meringue tasted of apple until you bit into the center “sorbet” made of bacon. My favorite of these amusing dishes looked like a macaroon, but exploded bomb-like with buttery goose liver. The chef showed us how a metal ring reaching 248 degrees Fahrenheit created a thin sugar-shell holding together the light and airy foie-gras mousse.

Minibar’s “baby carrots with coconut” is built on a technique famously invented by Chef Ferran Adria of Spain’s now-closed elBulli. Deconstructed carrots are rebuilt so an invisible outer skin, shaped as a carrot, encases an intense liquid essence of the vegetable. Minibar surrounds its “carrots” with dribbles of olive oil, exotic spices, and coconut flakes, creating a rolling wave of salty, soothing, sweet and piquant flavors in the mouth. A chef told us the dish took them 2.5 years to perfect.

While diners can order an expensive bottle of wine to go with their meal, I highly recommend sticking to the beverage packages designed to accompany the weird dishes. My buddy had the $75 “Experience,” twelve glasses that started with an amontillado sherry. I had the $200 “Jose,” which began with a Krug Grande Cuvee Brut Champagne and included, with some big names, a stunning Movia Sauvignon Blanc Primorje from Slovenia.

A smoked oyster arrived in a glass dome filled with apple wood smoke, and sat in an escabeche-style sauce of roast chicken stock and sherry vinegar. Their delicate white beans-and-clams dish from Asturias was tarted-up with slivers of pickled garlic, and was an homage, the lead chef told us, “to our boss.” Meanwhile, the simple “eggs and toast” was made sublime by an “egg white” actually made of Parmesan cheese.

Not every dish was a home run. In one, a morsel of lobster was ringed by yogurt, walling in a pool of chicken wing-and-lobster stock. The sauce didn’t fuse the competing yogurt-and-sea flavors for me. The chef said they had gone through 100 permutations and were still working on the dish.

For sheer fun, nothing beat the “dragon’s breath,” a cube of curried popcorn dipped in liquid nitrogen at the table. A furious stream of smoke roared out of my nostrils, like a dragon, when I bit into it. “Pine snow with honey” was an elegant dish of decorative pine branch and pine nuts, sprinkled with what looked exactly like icy snow, but was in fact a specially treated cheesy-yogurt, dribbled with honey. Two hours later, in yet another bar-type room, we had coffee, cognac, and a host of unique petits fours.

The waitress brought an egg to our table, smashed it with her fist, revealing our bill. The dinner cost $958 for two.

It’s a bargain. There is no way, even at those prices, that Chef Andres is making money on Minibar, considering the labor needed to create and “perform” each dish; only 24 guests, eating in staggered shifts, are picked each night from the 100 to 300 reservation requests that are emailed a month in advance. Minibar is really a “laboratory of ideas,” the creative lifeblood of Jose Andres’ successful group of restaurants and the ideal training ground for young chefs learning their boss’ style and ethos. This is not comfort food, but it is great theater, an evening filled with artistry of the highest order.

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